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ABOUT WHITESTONE
Whitestone history, Whitstone, famous people


CLUBS & GROUPS
Details of all Clubs, Groups & Societies


CHURCH
St Catherine's Church history


PARISH COUNCIL
Parish Council minutes & who's who


LOCAL INFORMATION
Recycling, Bus timetable, weather EX4


PARISH HALL
Details of the Parish Hall - Booking, hire, history


LOCAL BUSINESSES
Contacts for local businesses


MAGAZINE ARCHIVE
Parish magazine archive


MAP
Where is Whitestone Devon


VIDEO
Video extract of Whitestone 2000


LINKS
Web links for easy access


WHAT'S ON
Web links for easy access


CONTACT US
Details of how to contact us
PANTO 2019
Panto 2019


ENTERTAINMENTS
Whitestone Entertainments



Children sitting at Whitestone sign

Welcome to the Whitestone Devon website

created by Creative Whitestone and funded by Whitestone Parish Council for the benefit of all. This website is intended to give an insight into day-to-day Whitestone, a little of its history up to the present day and some of the other interests and businesses that are to be found here. 



Exmouth Shanty Men poster


RECYCLING

FOIL

You can now recycle foil in your black recycling box!
The following items will now be accepted for recycling;
Foil containers including ready meal trays, quiche & pie cases, take away trays and pet food trays.
Foil lids including such as those found on some yoghurt and cream tubs and pet food trays. Please rinse off any food residue.
Kitchen foil, please don’t include any foil that has lots of baked on food or is very greasy.
Not sure if its foil? Do the scrunch test!
Scrunch the pack or foil in your hand. If it stays scrunched it’s foil and can be recycled. If it springs open then its plastic ?lm and cannot be recycled.
No thanks
Some things look like foil but are plastic such as crisp packets, drink, baby and pet food pouches, shiny ‘foil’ gift wrap. Please put these in your black bin.

KEEP YOUR TOPS ON

What do you do with lids, tops and caps? If you find yourself asking “Are they recyclable?”, “Which bin do they go in?” and “Am I doing it right?” then read on.

These common questions now have a simple answer - YES! They are all recyclable! Simply give the bottle or jar a rinse, squash plastic bottles, put the top back on and recycle as you normally would - even if it’s a metal lid on a glass jar.

Many people still remember the early days of recycling when plastic lids caused a problem due to being a different kind of plastic or being heavily dyed. Thankfully, technology has improved over the years and we no longer have this problem. Hurrah!

In fact, the recycling industry preference is now for lids to remain attached to bottles and jars. Lids and caps are small and light, so attaching them to larger items keeps them contained during the collection and sorting process and prevents them from jamming machinery. It also helps keep plastic bottles squashed, so reduces volume and creates more space in your recycling bin, bag or box and on the recycling collection vehicle. All in all, keeping your top on gets a big thumbs up all round and helps maintain Devon’s 55.7% recycling rate.

So, what happens to plastic bottles with lids?

Plastics are shredded, cleaned and passed through a Sink-Float tank which separates different types of plastic by density. HDPE plastic, such as lids and caps, will float whereas PET plastic, such as bottles, will sink. So simple, but very effective! The different plastics are then sold on to manufacturers who turn the plastic shreds into new products, such as garden furniture, fencing, polyester clothing and even new bottles.

And glass jars?

Similarly to plastic, glass is crushed and cleaned before it passes through a process to remove any plastic or metal lids and collars. Plastic and metal is recycled into new products and glass is recycled into new bottles and jars.

All local councils in Devon will collect your plastic bottles in your usual household recycling service. Don’t forget bottles from your bathroom too!

Most authorities will collect your glass bottles and jars, however for the few that don't you can take them to your local Recycling Bank or Household Waste Recycling Centre.

If you're not sure what authority you live in, you can find out by using this handy postcode locator tool https://www.gov.uk/find-local-council and then click here to find what your council collects https://www.recycledevon.org/at-home/recycle-at-home

For more information click here

(Keeping lids on plastic and glass bottles and jars is applicable to residents in Exeter, Mid Devon, North Devon, Torridge, South Hams, West Devon, Teignbridge and Torbay. East Devon residents can keep lids on plastic bottles and jars but must separate lids from glass jars)



Social Club at Lily Farm Vineyard

On the 22 August 2018, the Whitestone Social Club organised a visit to Lily Farm Vineyard at Knowle, Budleigh Salterton. After an excellent introduction by the vigneron who gave us the history of the vineyard and the cultivation of his grapes, we sat down to sample the results of their labour. The wine was superb and rounded off a wonderful day out.



CHECK WHO YOU PAY TO TAKE YOUR RUBBISH AWAY

Check who takes your rubbish away

Did you know that you are legally responsible for the waste you are getting rid of? This means that, if it ends up getting dumped, you could face a fine and a criminal record.
Don’t become a victim of this type of crime. Before you pay someone to take your old fridge, furniture or bulky items away, follow our simple checklist
Simple steps
1. Check if they have a waste carriers licence. You can do this by checking on their website, asking to see their waste carriers licence and by calling the Environment Agency on 03708 506 506 for a free instant waste carrier check.
2. Make a record. Take a note or photograph of the registration number of the vehicle that is being used to take your waste away and ask where it will end up
3. Get a receipt. Ensure that you get a transfer notice or receipt before your waste is taken away

Check who takes your rubbish away

Remember that most unwanted bulky household items can be taken to your nearest recycling centre for free. Alternatively Teignbridge Council provide a free rural skip service and offer a charged bulky waste collection service. For more information please visit www.teignbridge.gov.uk/wastecarrier.



REPORT A POTHOLE
It is still possible to report any pothole you come across on a Devon Road. Just click on the arrow to be redirected to the Devon County Council page and fill in the details.
Devon County Council has almost tripled its number of pothole repair teams in response to the storm damage to roads across the county.
Over the winter storm period, since 23 December, the County Council has recorded more than 1,300 reports of fallen trees and branches on Devon’s roads, more than 150 embankment slips, and more than 4,000 flooding incidents across the county.
Around 11,500 potholes have also been reported by the public or found by highway inspectors so far in 2014. In response, the number of teams dealing with pothole safety defect repairs has increased from 13 to 34, with an extra 52 staff tackling the problem. The approximate additional cost of the work is around £65,000 a week.
The clear-up of the storm damage is estimated to cost around £3 million to the end of the financial year, but the County Council is yet to finalise a figure for the damage caused by the storms as the road network and structures are still being assessed.

Potholes



Some photos:
FETE 2017
Whitestone Fete 2017




Comments by email welcome

info@whitestone-devon.org.uk